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DIFFICULTY SEEING
IN LOW LIGHT

Night blindness or Nyctalopia
is an impairment that affects your
ability to see at night. It could be a
sign of a dietary imbalance, an eye
condition or a chronic disease.

SIGNS OF
NIGHT BLINDNESS

Your optician will be able to diagnose night blindness.

Symptoms of nyctalopia include; weak vision in dim light, difficulty seeing when driving at night and slow reaction time between bright and dim light conditions. Driving at night can be a particular challenge, due to the intermittent presence of headlights and streetlights on the road.

 

RELATED
EYE CONDITIONS

While a condition in it's own right, night blindness may be the result of a related eye problem, listed below.

Astigmatism - With astigmatism, when lighting dims, your pupils dilate to let in more light creating more blur than you would in daylight.

Diabetes - Poor night vision can be an early sign of diabetes. High blood sugar is harmful to the blood vessels and nerves in the eye. A symptom of diabetes is retinopathy, where the back of the eye is gradually damaged. As a result, adjustment to light, such as coming indoors from bright light outside, is slowed.

Cataracts - With cataracts, you'll notice that oncoming headlights cause more reflections than before as you'll be more sensitive to light.

Retinitis Pigmentosa - A group of inherited vision disorders which lead to the progressive degeneration of the retina. Deteriorating night vision is often the earliest symptom. Over time, the peripheral (side) vision gradually decreases.